Monoamine Oxidase

Monoamine Oxidase

Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is an enzyme that tethered to the outer mitochondrial membrane, and is responsible for oxidative metabolism of catecholamines, in the process generating an oxidized catechol aldehyde, ammonia, and a hydrogen peroxide molecule. Because of the vital role that MAOs play in the inactivation of neurotransmitters, MAO dysfunction is thought to be responsible for a number of psychiatric and neurological disorders. MAO-A inhibitors act as antidepressant and antianxiety agents, whereas MAO-B inhibitors are used alone or in combination to treat Alzheimer'sand Parkinson's diseases.

Monoamine oxidases (MAOs) serve a crucial function in the regulation of mood and behavior. Flavin-containing MAOs catalyze the oxidative deamination of both dietary and neuroactive monoamines, generating the byproduct hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The two MAO isoenzymes, MAO A and (SSRIs). However, the development of reversible inhibitors of MAO A (RIMAs), which have proven effective in treatment-resistant and atypical depression, may spur the development of novel MAO inhibitors with enhanced safety and effectiveness.

Reference:Timothy M. Darden. USE OF MONOAMINE OXIDASE AND REDOX ENZYMESIN ATRIAL TISSUE AS NOVEL PREDICTORS OF POSTOPERATIVE ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

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